Brain Changes in Postmenopausal Women: MRI Analysis | Aging-US

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March 31, 2024

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  • Aging-US published this research paper as the cover for Volume 16, Issue 6, entitled, "Altered brain morphology and functional connectivity in postmenopausal women: automatic segmentation of whole-brain and thalamic subnuclei and resting-state fMRI" by researchers from the Advanced Institute of Aging Science, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Republic of Korea; Department of Urology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 61469, Republic of Korea; Department of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju 61469, Republic of Korea. DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.205662 Corresponding author - Gwang-Woo Jeong - gwjeong@jnu.ac.kr Abstract The transition to menopause is associated with various physiological changes, including alterations in brain structure and function. However, menopause-related structural and functional changes are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was not only to compare the brain volume changes between premenopausal and postmenopausal women, but also to evaluate the functional connectivity between the targeted brain regions associated with structural atrophy in postmenopausal women. Each 21 premenopausal and postmenopausal women underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). T1-weighted MRI and resting-state functional MRI data were used to compare the brain volume and seed-based functional connectivity, respectively. In statistical analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, with age and whole brain volume as covariates, was used to evaluate surface areas and subcortical volumes between the two groups. Postmenopausal women showed significantly smaller cortical surface, especially in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC), right superior temporal cortex, and right lateral orbitofrontal cortex, compared to premenopausal women (p < 0.05, Bonferroni-corrected) as well as significantly decreased functional connectivity between the left mOFC and the right thalamus was observed (p < 0.005, Monte-Carlo corrected). Although postmenopausal women did not show volume atrophy in the right thalamus, the volume of the right pulvinar anterior, which is one of the distinguished thalamic subnuclei, was significantly decreased (p < 0.05, Bonferroni-corrected). Taken together, our findings suggest that diminished brain volume and functional connectivity may be linked to menopause-related symptoms caused by the lower sex hormone levels. Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article - https://aging.altmetric.com/details/email_updates?id=10.18632%2Faging.205662 Subscribe for free publication alerts from Aging - https://www.aging-us.com/subscribe-to-toc-alerts Keywords - aging, brain morphology, functional connectivity, sex hormones, thalamic subnuclei About Aging-US Aging publishes research papers in all fields of aging research including but not limited, aging from yeast to mammals, cellular senescence, age-related diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s diseases and their prevention and treatment, anti-aging strategies and drug development and especially the role of signal transduction pathways such as mTOR in aging and potential approaches to modulate these signaling pathways to extend lifespan. The journal aims to promote treatment of age-related diseases by slowing down aging, validation of anti-aging drugs by treating age-related diseases, prevention of cancer by inhibiting aging. Cancer and COVID-19 are age-related diseases. Aging is indexed by PubMed/Medline (abbreviated as “Aging (Albany NY)”), PubMed Central, Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (abbreviated as “Aging‐US” and listed in the Cell Biology and Geriatrics & Gerontology categories), Scopus (abbreviated as “Aging” and listed in the Cell Biology and Aging categories), Biological Abstracts, BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, META (Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) (2018-2022), and Dimensions (Digital Science). Please visit our website at https://www.Aging-US.com​​ and connect with us: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AgingUS/ X - https://twitter.com/AgingJrnl Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/agingjrnl/ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/@AgingJournal LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/aging/ Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/AgingUS/ Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/1X4HQQgegjReaf6Mozn6Mc Media Contact 18009220957 MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM

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