Top-Performer: Reversal of Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

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August 24, 2021

Aging-US published this trending high-scoring research paper back on June 12, 2016, entitled, “Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease,” by researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, CA; Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA; California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA; Private Practice of Psychiatry, Tucson, AZ; Brainreader, Horsens, Denmark. Abstract: Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems nationally and globally. Recently, the first description of the reversal of cognitive decline in patients with early Alzheimer's disease or its precursors, MCI (mild cognitive impairment) and SCI (subjective cognitive impairment), was published [1]. The therapeutic approach used was programmatic and personalized rather than monotherapeutic and invariant, and was dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND). Patients who had had to discontinue work were able to return to work, and those struggling at work were able to improve their performance. The patients, their spouses, and their co-workers all reported clear improvements. Here we report the results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing in ten patients with cognitive decline, nine ApoE4+ (five homozygous and four heterozygous) and one ApoE4-, who were treated with the MEND protocol for 5-24 months. The magnitude of the improvement is unprecedented, providing additional objective evidence that this programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. These results have far-reaching implications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, MCI, and SCI; for personalized programs that may enhance pharmaceutical efficacy; and for personal identification of ApoE genotype. Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article - https://oncotarget.altmetric.com/details/email_updates?id=10.18632%2Foncotarget.100981 DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.100981 Full text - https://www.aging-us.com/article/100981/text Correspondence to: Dale E. Bredesen, MD email: dbredesen@buckinstitute.org Keywords: neurodegeneration, cognition, biomarkers, dementia, neuropsychology, imaging, Alzheimer's disease, Apolipoprotein E About Aging-US Launched in 2009, Aging-US publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research and age-related diseases, including cancer—and now, with a special focus on COVID-19 vulnerability as an age-dependent syndrome. Topics in Aging-US go beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR, among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways. Please visit our website at http://www.Aging-US.com​​ or connect with us on: Twitter - https://twitter.com/AgingJrnl​ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AgingUS/​ SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/aging-us​ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/agingus​ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/aging​ Aging-US is published by Impact Journals, LLC please visit http://www.ImpactJournals.com​​ or connect with @ImpactJrnls Media Contact 18009220957 MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM

Imaging/MicroscopyNeuroscience

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