Top-Performer: Disease or Not, Aging is Easily Treatable

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July 13, 2021

Aging published this theory article on November 17, 2018, entitled, “Disease or not, aging is easily treatable,” by Dr. Mikhail V. Blagosklonny from the Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY. Abstract: Is aging a disease? It does not matter because aging is already treated using a combination of several clinically-available drugs, including rapamycin. Whether aging is a disease depends on arbitrary definitions of both disease and aging. For treatment purposes, aging is a deadly disease (or more generally, pre-disease), despite being a normal continuation of normal organismal growth. It must and, importantly, can be successfully treated, thereby delaying classic age-related diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, and neurodegeneration. To date, this study has generated an Altmetric Attention Score of 54. The Altmetric Attention Score provides an at-a-glance indication of the volume and type of online attention the research has received. Top Aging publications rated by Altmetric Attention Score - https://www.aging-us.com/news_room/altmetric Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article - https://oncotarget.altmetric.com/details/email_updates?id=10.18632%2Foncotarget.101647 DOI - https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.101647 Full text - https://www.aging-us.com/article/101647/text Correspondence to: Mikhail V. Blagosklonny email: mikhail.blagosklonny@roswellpark.org Keywords: gerossuppresants, senolytics, longevity, lifespan, aging About Aging Launched in 2009, Aging publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research and age-related diseases, including cancer—and now, with a special focus on COVID-19 vulnerability as an age-dependent syndrome. Topics in Aging go beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR, among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways. Please visit our website at http://www.Aging-US.com​​ or connect with us on: Twitter - https://twitter.com/AgingJrnl​ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/AgingUS/​ SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/aging-us​ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/agingus​ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/aging​ Aging is published by Impact Journals, LLC please visit http://www.ImpactJournals.com​​ or connect with @ImpactJrnls Media Contact 18009220957 MEDIA@IMPACTJOURNALS.COM

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